The Glove’s All-Attitude Performance on BBC2’s Riverside

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One of our favorite post-punk side projects would have to be The Glove. As the LSD lovechild of Robert Smith of the Cure and Steve Severin of Siouxsie and the Banshees, The Glove was based on drug binges, Smith’s childhood fascination with The Beatles (even using “the glove” featured in the Yellow Submarine movie) and creepy movies on repeat such as David Cronenberg’s Videodrome. The Glove released one album titled Blue Sunshine – taken from the title of a horror movie – and was released in 1983 on Polydor, the parent label of Fiction Records (The Cure’s home base up to the new century). All but two tracks on Blue Sunshine featured the wishy-washy vocals of Jeanett Landray, who at the time, was dating Budgie from The Banshees.

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BBC2’s Riverside series encapsulated some of the most memorable post-punk performances in the genre’s history. Remember the ballet performance to The Cure’s “Siamese Twins”? Or perhaps Peter Murphy’s post-Bauhaus interpretative dance in the desert? Yep, that was Riverside as well. Filmed in London, the show featured a couple performances by each band with some solid 80s graphics, editing techniques and filters. From what I’ve found, the show only lasted 2 years, from 1982 and 1983 in which they provided some of the most entertaining visuals for these “serious” dark bands.

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The first song The Glove performs is “Orgy”, a tribal-inspired track that probably pertains to drugs somehow (as most of the album does, anyway). It begins with Porl Thompson (on-and-off Cure guitar player and the brother-in-law to Smith) pretending to play violin and one-eyed Andy Anderson on drums (who had a stint in The Cure around this time). Landray climbs up and around pipes while Smith toots into a wooden recorder and Severin plays bass. “Punish Me With Kisses” begins a bit more traditional in form with Smith standing shyly and holding his guitar, Severin on bass, Thompson on “keyboards” and Anderson still on drums. Landray dances in slow and dramatic post-punk fashion as she lip-syncs to the song – as a former dancer/choreographer, this probably came quite easy. This clip is a great representation of the confusing, druggy haze of Blue Sunshine and The Glove, as you will see below: